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jibe1

[jahyb] /dʒaɪb/
verb (used without object), jibed, jibing.
1.
to shift from one side to the other when running before the wind, as a fore-and-aft sail or its boom.
2.
to alter course so that a fore-and-aft sail shifts in this manner.
verb (used with object), jibed, jibing.
3.
to cause to jibe.
noun
4.
the act of jibing.
Also, gibe, gybe, jib, jibb.
Origin
1685-1695
1685-95; variant of gybe < Dutch gijben, more commonly gijpen

jibe2

[jahyb] /dʒaɪb/
verb (used without object), verb (used with object), jibed, jibing, noun
1.
gibe1 .

jibe3

[jahyb] /dʒaɪb/
verb (used without object), jibed, jibing.
1.
to be in harmony or accord; agree:
The report does not quite jibe with the commissioner's observations.
Origin
1805-15, Americanism; origin uncertain
Synonyms
conform, accord, fit.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for jibe
  • When the results of the popular vote jibe with the electoral vote, there is no problem with the system.
  • It also seems to jibe well with the common observation that individuals have particular talents.
  • The jibe hurts because, in an era of highly complex financial engineering, it has an element of truth.
  • Not bad for someone who not so long ago didn't know the difference between a tack and a jibe.
  • So, the jibe about government being subordinate to corporations apparently cuts both ways.
  • There is a problem, however, with this futuristic vision: it does not appear to jibe with reality.
  • Since then the horizontal jibe has stuck, inaccurate and unfair though it has become.
  • Their answer doesn't quite jibe with current conventional wisdom.
  • What designers write and what one sees jibe only rarely.
  • If anyone in your party does take offence at a jibe, apologise quickly and profusely.
British Dictionary definitions for jibe

gibe1

/dʒaɪb/
verb
1.
to make jeering or scoffing remarks (at); taunt
noun
2.
a derisive or provoking remark
Derived Forms
giber, jiber, noun
gibingly, jibingly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: perhaps from Old French giber to treat roughly, of uncertain origin

gybe

/dʒaɪb/
verb
1.
(intransitive) (of a fore-and-aft sail) to shift suddenly from one side of the vessel to the other when running before the wind, as the result of allowing the wind to catch the leech
2.
to cause (a sailing vessel) to gybe or (of a sailing vessel) to undergo gybing
noun
3.
an instance of gybing
Word Origin
C17: from obsolete Dutch gijben (now gijpen), of obscure origin

jibe1

/dʒaɪb/
verb, noun
1.
(nautical) variants of gybe

jibe2

/dʒaɪb/
verb
1.
a variant spelling of gibe1
Derived Forms
jiber, noun
jibingly, adverb

jibe3

/dʒaɪb/
verb
1.
(intransitive) (informal) to agree; accord; harmonize
Word Origin
C19: of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for jibe
v.

"agree, fit," 1813, of unknown origin, perhaps a figurative extension of earlier jib, gybe (v.) "shift a sail or boom" (see jib). OED, however, suggests a phonetic variant of chime, as if meaning "to chime in with, to be in harmony." Related: Jibed; jibes; jibing.

n.

1560s, perhaps from Middle French giber "to handle roughly," or an alteration of gaber "to mock."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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