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jingal

or gingal, gingall

[jin-gawl] /ˈdʒɪn gɔl/
noun
1.
a large musket fired from a rest, often mounted on a carriage: formerly used in India, China, etc.
Origin of jingal
1810-1820
1810-20; < Hindi janjāl, variant of janjār
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for jingal
Historical Examples
  • There was a second crack, and the freebooter dropped under the jingal and never moved.

    Jack Haydon's Quest John Finnemore
  • "Say, I fancy I see a bunch of 'em just beyond the jingal," said Buck.

    Jack Haydon's Quest John Finnemore
  • Every jingal, musket, and rifle in the jong was then loosed off in any and every direction.

    The Unveiling of Lhasa Edmund Candler
  • But normally, in the latter stages of its flight, the jingal bullet lets you know it is coming.

    To Lhassa at Last Powell Millington
  • But with the pressure upon the trigger the barrel of the Chinese jingal deviated slightly in the same direction.

    An Iceland Fisherman Pierre Loti
  • Some jingal bullets did on occasion fall fairly near the bridge, and one mule was actually hit in the act of crossing.

    To Lhassa at Last Powell Millington
  • The jingal was fired no more, the musketry had dropped, and the stillness remained perfectly unbroken.

    Jack Haydon's Quest John Finnemore
  • In the event of a rapid retreat the jingal remains to become the spoil of the captor.

    China Sir Henry Arthur Blake
  • The jingal, for instance, is a delightful weapon at that range.

    To Lhassa at Last Powell Millington
  • The enemy kept up a continuous but ineffectual fire from the ridge, none of their jingal bullets falling anywhere near us.

    The Unveiling of Lhasa Edmund Candler

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14
19
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