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Judas

[joo-duh s] /ˈdʒu dəs/
noun
1.
Also called Judas Iscariot. the disciple who betrayed Jesus. Mark 3:19.
2.
a person treacherous enough to betray a friend; traitor.
3.
Also called Saint Judas, Saint Jude. one of the 12 apostles (not Judas Iscariot). Luke 6:16; Acts 1:13; John 14:22.
4.
a brother of James (and possibly of Jesus). Matt. 13:55; Mark 6:3.
5.
(usually lowercase). Also called judas hole. a peephole, as in an entrance door or the door of a prison cell.
adjective
6.
(of an animal) used as a decoy to lead other animals to slaughter:
A Judas goat led sheep into the abattoir.
Related forms
Judaslike, adjective

Judah

[joo-duh] /ˈdʒu də/
noun
1.
the fourth son of Jacob and Leah. Gen. 29:35.
2.
one of the 12 tribes of Israel traditionally descended from him.
3.
the Biblical kingdom of the Hebrews in S Palestine, including the tribes of Judah and Benjamin.
Compare Ephraim (def 3).
4.
a male given name: from a Hebrew word meaning “praised.”.
Also, Douay Bible, Juda (for defs 1–3).
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for Judas

judas

/ˈdʒuːdəs/
noun
1.
(sometimes capital) a peephole or a very small window in a door Also called judas window, judas hole
Word Origin
C19: after Judas Iscariot

Judas

/ˈdʒuːdəs/
noun
1.
(New Testament) the apostle who betrayed Jesus to his enemies for 30 pieces of silver (Luke 22:3–6, 47–48) Full name Judas Iscariot
2.
a person who betrays a friend; traitor
3.
a brother or relative of James and also of Jesus (Matthew 13:55). This figure, Thaddaeus, and Jude were probably identical
adjective
4.
denoting an animal or bird used to lure others of its kind or lead them to slaughter

Judah

/ˈdʒuːdə/
noun (Old Testament)
1.
the fourth son of Jacob, one of whose descendants was to be the Messiah (Genesis 29:35; 49:8–12)
2.
the tribe descended from him
3.
the tribal territory of his descendants which became the nucleus of David's kingdom and, after the kingdom had been divided into Israel and Judah, the southern kingdom of Judah, with Jerusalem as its centre
Douay spelling Juda
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for Judas

biblical betrayer of Christ, Latin form of Greek Ioudas, from Hebrew Yehudha (see Judah). As a name for a malicious traitor, it is attested from late 15c. Judas priest as an exclamation in place of "Jesus Christ" is from 1914. Judas tree (1660s) supposedly was the type from which Judas hanged himself. The Judas goat (1941) leads sheep to the shackling pen.

Judah

masc. proper name, biblical son of Jacob by Leah, also the name of a tribe of Israel, from Hebrew Yehudah, from stem of y-d-h, literally "praised."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Judas in the Bible

praise, the fourth son of Jacob by Leah. The name originated in Leah's words of praise to the Lord on account of his birth: "Now will I praise [Heb. odeh] Jehovah, and she called his name Yehudah" (Gen. 29:35). It was Judah that interposed in behalf of Joseph, so that his life was spared (Gen. 37:26, 27). He took a lead in the affairs of the family, and "prevailed above his brethren" (Gen. 43:3-10; 44:14, 16-34; 46:28; 1 Chr. 5:2). Soon after the sale of Joseph to the Ishmaelites, Judah went to reside at Adullam, where he married a woman of Canaan. (See ONAN ØT0002787; TAMAR.) After the death of his wife Shuah, he returned to his father's house, and there exercised much influence over the patriarch, taking a principal part in the events which led to the whole family at length going down into Egypt. We hear nothing more of him till he received his father's blessing (Gen. 49:8-12).


the Graecized form of Judah. (1.) The patriarch (Matt. 1:2, 3). (2.) Son of Simon (John 6:71; 13:2, 26), surnamed Iscariot, i.e., a man of Kerioth (Josh. 15:25). His name is uniformly the last in the list of the apostles, as given in the synoptic (i.e., the first three) Gospels. The evil of his nature probably gradually unfolded itself till "Satan entered into him" (John 13:27), and he betrayed our Lord (18:3). Afterwards he owned his sin with "an exceeding bitter cry," and cast the money he had received as the wages of his iniquity down on the floor of the sanctuary, and "departed and went and hanged himself" (Matt. 27:5). He perished in his guilt, and "went unto his own place" (Acts 1:25). The statement in Acts 1:18 that he "fell headlong and burst asunder in the midst, and all his bowels gushed out," is in no way contrary to that in Matt. 27:5. The sucide first hanged himself, perhaps over the valley of Hinnom, "and the rope giving way, or the branch to which he hung breaking, he fell down headlong on his face, and was crushed and mangled on the rocky pavement below." Why such a man was chosen to be an apostle we know not, but it is written that "Jesus knew from the beginning who should betray him" (John 6:64). Nor can any answer be satisfactorily given to the question as to the motives that led Judas to betray his Master. "Of the motives that have been assigned we need not care to fix on any one as that which simply led him on. Crime is, for the most part, the result of a hundred motives rushing with bewildering fury through the mind of the criminal." (3.) A Jew of Damascus (Acts 9:11), to whose house Ananias was sent. The street called "Straight" in which it was situated is identified with the modern "street of bazaars," where is still pointed out the so-called "house of Judas." (4.) A Christian teacher, surnamed Barsabas. He was sent from Jerusalem to Antioch along with Paul and Barnabas with the decision of the council (Acts 15:22, 27, 32). He was a "prophet" and a "chief man among the brethren."

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Encyclopedia Article for Judas

one of the original Twelve Apostles. He is distinguished in John 14:22 as "not Iscariot" to avoid identification with the betrayer of Jesus, Judas Iscariot. Listed in Luke 6:16 and Acts 1:13 as "Judas of James," some Biblical versions (e.g., Revised Standard and New English) interpret this designation to mean "son of James" (i.e., probably the Apostle St. James, son of Alphaeus), while others (e.g., Authorized and Douay) call him "brother of James." Judas is more probably identified with Thaddaeus (Lebbaeus) in Mark 3:18 and Matt. 10:3 and less probably with Jesus' "brother" Judas (Mark 6:3, Matt. 13:55), reputed author of the canonical Letter of Jude that warns against the licentious and blasphemous heretics.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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