junker

junker

[juhng-ker] ,
noun Slang.
a car that is old, worn out, or in bad enough repair to be scrapped.

Origin:
1880–85, Americanism, for an earlier sense; junk1 + -er1

Dictionary.com Unabridged

Junker

[yoong-ker] ,
noun
1.
a member of a class of aristocratic landholders, especially in East Prussia, strongly devoted to militarism and authoritarianism, from among whom the German military forces recruited a large number of its officers.
2.
a young German, especially Prussian, nobleman.
3.
a German official or military officer who is narrow-minded, haughty, and overbearing.

Origin:
1545–55; < German; Old High German junchērro, equivalent to junc young + hērro Herr

junk

1 [juhngk]
noun
1.
any old or discarded material, as metal, paper, or rags.
2.
anything that is regarded as worthless, meaningless, or contemptible; trash.
3.
old cable or cordage used when untwisted for making gaskets, swabs, oakum, etc.
4.
Nautical Slang. salt junk.
5.
Baseball Slang. relatively slow, unorthodox pitches that are deceptive to the batter in movement or pace, as knuckleballs or forkballs.
verb (used with object)
6.
to cast aside as junk; discard as no longer of use; scrap.
adjective
7.
cheap, worthless, unwanted, or trashy.

Origin:
1480–90; earlier jonke, of uncertain origin


1, 2. rubbish, litter, debris, refuse.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
junk1 (dʒʌŋk)
 
n
1.  discarded or secondhand objects, etc, collectively
2.  informal
 a.  rubbish generally
 b.  nonsense: the play was absolute junk
3.  slang any narcotic drug, esp heroin
 
vb
4.  informal (tr) to discard as junk; scrap
 
[C15 jonke old useless rope]

junk2 (dʒʌŋk)
 
n
a sailing vessel used in Chinese waters and characterized by a very high poop, flat bottom, and square sails supported by battens
 
[C17: from Portuguese junco, from Javanese jon; related to Dutch jonk]

Junker (ˈjʊŋkə)
 
n
1.  history any of the aristocratic landowners of Prussia who were devoted to maintaining their identity and extensive social and political privileges
2.  an arrogant, narrow-minded, and tyrannical German army officer or official
3.  (formerly) a young German nobleman
 
[C16: from German, from Old High German junchērro young lord, from junc young + hērro master, lord]
 
'Junkerdom
 
n
 
'Junkerism
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

junk
"worthless stuff," 1338, junke "old cable or rope" (nautical), of uncertain origin, perhaps from O.Fr. junc "rush," from L. juncus "rush, reed." Nautical use extended to "old refuse from boats and ships" (1842), then to "old or discarded articles of any kind" (1884). The verb meaning "to throw away as
trash, to scrap" is from 1916. Junkie "drug addict" is attested from 1923, but junk for "narcotic" is said to be older. Junk food is from 1973; junk art is from 1966; junk mail first attested 1954.

junk
"Chinese sailing ship," 1613, from Port. junco, from Malay jong "ship, large boat" (13c.), probably from Javanese djong.

junker
"young Ger. noble," 1554, from Ger., from O.H.G. juncherro, lit. "young lord," from junc "young" + herro "lord." Pejorative sense of "reactionary younger member of the Prussian aristocracy" (1865) dates from Bismarck's domestic policy.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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