juror

[joor-er, -awr]
noun
1.
one of a group of persons sworn to deliver a verdict in a case submitted to them; member of a jury.
2.
one of the panel from which a jury is selected.
3.
one of a group of people who judge a competition.
4.
a person who has taken an oath or sworn allegiance.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English jurour < Anglo-French (compare Old French jureur), equivalent to Old French jur(er) to swear (< Latin jūrāre) + -our -or2

jurist, juror.
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World English Dictionary
juror (ˈdʒʊərə)
 
n
1.  a member of a jury
2.  a person whose name is included on a panel from which a jury is selected
3.  a person who takes an oath
 
[C14: from Anglo-French jurour, from Old French jurer to take an oath, from Latin jūrāre]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

juror
late 14c. (attested from late 12c. in Anglo-L.), from Anglo-Fr. jurour (1292; O.Fr. jureor), from L. juratonem (nom. jurator) "swearer," agent noun from jurare "to swear" (see jury (n.)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
No one practicing polygamy was allowed to act as a juror, hold office in courts, or vote in elections.
They turned around to discover it was a juror with a shaved head and dark eyes and earrings in both ears.
They are selected in case of emergency, illness by a regular juror or other need to replace a regular juror.
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