ketubah

[Ashkenazic Hebrew, English kuh-too-buh; Sephardic Hebrew kuh-too-bah]
noun, plural ketuboth, ketubot, ketubos [Ashkenazic Hebrew kuh-too-bohs; Sephardic Hebrew kuh-too-bawt] . English, ketubahs. Hebrew.
the formal contract in a Jewish religious marriage that includes specific financial protection for the wife in the event that the husband dies or divorces her.

Origin:
kəthubbāh literally, something written

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World English Dictionary
ketubah (kətuˈbaː)
 
n
Judaism the contract that states the obligations within Jewish marriage
 
[from Hebrew, literally: document]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

ketubah

formal Jewish marriage contract written in Aramaic and guaranteeing a bride certain future rights before her marriage. Since Jewish religious law permits a man to divorce his wife at any time for any reason, the ketubba was introduced in ancient times to protect a woman's rights and to make divorce a costly matter for the husband. The conditions stipulated in the document also guarantee the woman's right to property when her husband dies. A Jewish wife carefully preserves the ketubba, not as evidence of marriage but for its future value

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
And if she curses him with no reason, he divorces her without paying her the ketubah.
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