kitchen

[kich-uhn]
noun
1.
a room or place equipped for cooking.
2.
culinary department; cuisine: This restaurant has a fine Italian kitchen.
3.
the staff or equipment of a kitchen.
adjective
4.
of, pertaining to, or designed for use in a kitchen: kitchen window; kitchen curtains.
5.
employed in or assigned to a kitchen: kitchen help.
6.
of or resembling a pidginized language, especially one used for communication between employers and servants or other employees who do not speak the same language.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English kichene, Old English cyceneLatin coquīna, equivalent to coqu(ere) to cook + -īna -ine1; cf. cuisine

kitchenless, adjective
kitcheny, adjective
outkitchen, noun
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Collins
World English Dictionary
kitchen (ˈkɪtʃɪn)
 
n
a.  a room or part of a building equipped for preparing and cooking food
 b.  (as modifier): a kitchen table
 
[Old English cycene, ultimately from Late Latin coquīna, from Latin coquere to cook; see kiln]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

kitchen
O.E. cycene, from W.Gmc. *kocina (cf. M.Du. cökene, O.H.G. chuhhina, Ger. Küche, Dan. kjøkken), probably borrowed from V.L. *cocina (cf. Fr. cuisine, Sp. cocina), variant of L. coquina "kitchen," from fem. of coquinus "of cooks," from coquus "cook," from coquere "to cook" (see
cook (n.)). Kitchen cabinet "informal but powerful set of advisors" is Amer.Eng. slang, 1832, originally in ref. to administration of President Andrew Jackson. Kitchen midden (1863) in archaeology translates Dan. kjøkken mødding. The New York City neighborhood of Hell's Kitchen is first attested 1894. Kitchenette is from 1910, Amer.Eng. Phrase everything but the kitchen sink is from World War II armed forces slang, in ref. to intense bombardment.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Example sentences
As he pretends to prepare food, his movements are transmitted to a robot chef
  in a real kitchen elsewhere in the building.
Any cook knows that baking or cooking with fruit often results in large amounts
  of kitchen scraps.
When they go to the kitchen to see if there is food, they are surprised to find
  that there is some and it hasn't expired.
If you have any extra food items or canned goods, take them to a soup kitchen.
Image for kitchen
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