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knife-edged

[nahyf-ejd] /ˈnaɪfˌɛdʒd/
adjective
1.
having a thin, sharp edge.
Origin of knife-edged
1860-1865
1860-65
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for knife-edged
Historical Examples
  • The first means sharp, the second narrow, both applying well to the knife-edged ridges of the desert.

    Tent Work in Palestine Claude Reignier Conder
  • It took all the Indian's grit to hold on to that knife-edged war club.

    Rolf In The Woods Ernest Thompson Seton
  • From the knife-edged ridge above our eagles eyrie (height 5500 feet) we enjoyed a memorable view.

    Unexplored Spain Abel Chapman
  • The lama was mildly surprised that any one should object to the knife-edged breezes which had cut the years off his shoulders.

    Kim Rudyard Kipling
  • When the soldiers reached the knife-edged passage, he was prompted to warn them.

    The House of Pride Jack London
  • Others cling to the knife-edged back of some difficult spur.

  • And again the knife-edged passage was disputed, and again they fell back to the beach.

    The House of Pride Jack London
  • By her side the little Spaniard with his knife-edged trousers and thin-waisted coat appeared comic.

    Dust of the Desert Robert Welles Ritchie
  • They are knife-edged, and the lower fits exactly inside the upper, so that they give a very firm grip.

    The Woodpeckers Fannie Hardy Eckstorm
  • The knife-edged saddle is very rotten, but leads to a firm block of rock nearly 1,000 ft. above the sea.

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Word Value for knife

12
13
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