lackluster

[lak-luhs-ter]
adjective
1.
lacking brilliance or radiance; dull: lackluster eyes.
2.
lacking liveliness, vitality, spirit, or enthusiasm: a lackluster performance.
noun
3.
a lack of brilliance or vitality.
Also, especially British, lacklustre.


Origin:
1590–1600; lack + luster1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
lacklustre or (US) lackluster (ˈlækˌlʌstə)
 
adj
lacking force, brilliance, or vitality
 
lackluster or (US) lackluster
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lackluster
c.1600, first attested in "As You Like It," from lack + luster. Combinations with lack- were frequent in 16c., e.g. lackland (1590s), of a landless man; lack-Latin (1530s), of an ignorant priest.

lacklustre
British spelling of lackluster (q.v.); for suffix, see -re.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Kirk's illustrations aren't too bad, but they do look dated and rather
  lacklustre.
The exorbitantly priced shellfish plate recently featured desiccated oysters
  and lacklustre crab claws.
The bank's offer has already been extended once because of lacklustre response.
Buyers are under pressure to invest their capital after lacklustre activity
  over the past two years.
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