lament

[luh-ment]
verb (used with object)
1.
to feel or express sorrow or regret for: to lament his absence.
2.
to mourn for or over.
verb (used without object)
3.
to feel, show, or express grief, sorrow, or regret.
4.
to mourn deeply.
noun
5.
an expression of grief or sorrow.
6.
a formal expression of sorrow or mourning, especially in verse or song; an elegy or dirge.

Origin:
1520–30; (noun) < Latin lāmentum plaint; (v.) < Latin lāmentārī, derivative of lāmentum

lamenter, noun
lamentingly, adverb


1, 2. bewail, bemoan, deplore. 3, 4. grieve, weep. 5. lamentation, moan. 6. monody, threnody.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
lament (ləˈmɛnt)
 
vb
1.  to feel or express sorrow, remorse, or regret (for or over)
 
n
2.  an expression of sorrow
3.  a poem or song in which a death is lamented
 
[C16: from Latin lāmentum]
 
la'menter
 
n
 
la'mentingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lament
1530s, back-formation from lamentation. The noun is recorded from 1590s. Related: Lamented; lamenting.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

lament

a nonnarrative poem expressing deep grief or sorrow over a personal loss. The form developed as part of the oral tradition along with heroic poetry and exists in most languages. Examples include Deor's Lament, an early Anglo-Saxon poem, in which a minstrel regrets his change of status in relation to his patron, and the ancient Sumerian "Lament for the Destruction of Ur." Compare complaint; elegy.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
My first comment in response to you is more of a general lament about modern
  science than a specific dig at cognitive studies.
There he managed to meld abstraction and antiquity, painting and drawing,
  lament and reverie.
Some businesses lament this fact when bad reviews start costing them business.
Advocates of hybrid technology often lament the high cost of the cars.
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