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lard

[lahrd] /lɑrd/
noun
1.
the rendered fat of hogs, especially the internal fat of the abdomen.
verb (used with object)
2.
to apply lard or grease to.
3.
to prepare or enrich (lean meat, chicken, etc.) with pork or fat, especially with lardons.
4.
to supplement or enrich with something for improvement or ornamentation:
a literary work larded with mythological allusions.
Origin
late Middle English
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English (v.), late Middle English (noun) < Middle French larder (v.), lard (noun) < Latin lār(i)dum bacon fat; akin to Greek lārīnós fat (adj.)
Related forms
lardlike, adjective
overlard, verb (used with object)
unlarded, adjective
well-larded, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for lard
  • Pigs carved from lard celebrate in song the benefits of fat.
  • He was a tub of lard whom you could willingly have pushed over a cliff.
  • They use of a lot of lard to improve the mouth feel.
  • And of course it was my bad not to lard even more caveats into the post in the first place.
  • The restaurant slices it raw, simmers it in lard, and tucks it into a soft sesame bun under a scoop of ricotta.
  • Work lard into flour, first using knife then tips of fingers.
  • Put flour in bowl, add lard, and cut it in with knife.
  • lard back and hind legs, and season with salt and pepper.
  • They lard their lean books with the fat of others' works.
  • The others took up the bow, and warmed it at the fire, and rubbed it with lard to make it more pliable.
British Dictionary definitions for lard

lard

/lɑːd/
noun
1.
the rendered fat from a pig, esp from the abdomen, used in cooking
2.
(informal) excess fat on a person's body
verb (transitive)
3.
to prepare (lean meat, poultry, etc) by inserting small strips of bacon or fat before cooking
4.
to cover or smear (foods) with lard
5.
to add extra material to (speech or writing); embellish
Derived Forms
lardlike, adjective
Word Origin
C15: via Old French from Latin lāridum bacon fat
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for lard
lard
c.1420, "fat of a swine," from O.Fr. larde "bacon fat," from L. lardum "lard, bacon," probably cognate with Gk. larinos "fat," laros "pleasing to the taste."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for lard

lard

Related Terms

tub of guts


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Encyclopedia Article for lard

soft, creamy, white solid or semisolid fat with butter-like consistency, obtained by rendering or melting the fatty tissue of hogs. A highly valued cooking and baking fat, lard is blended, frequently after modification by molecular rearrangement or hydrogenation, with other fats and oils to make shortening. Antioxidants are usually added to lard and shortenings to protect against rancidity. Lard is also used in pharmacy and perfumery to make ointments and pomades.

Learn more about lard with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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5
6
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