lavish

[lav-ish]
adjective
1.
expended, bestowed, or occurring in profusion: lavish spending.
2.
using or giving in great amounts; prodigal (often followed by of ): lavish of his time; lavish of affection.
verb (used with object)
3.
to expend or give in great amounts or without limit: to lavish gifts on a person.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English lavas profusion (noun), profuse (adj.) < Middle French lavasse downpour of rain, derivative of laver to wash < Latin lavāre

lavisher, noun
lavishly, adverb
lavishness, noun
overlavish, adjective
overlavishly, adverb
overlavishness, noun
unlavish, adjective
unlavished, adjective


1, 2. unstinted, extravagant, wasteful, improvident; generous, openhanded. Lavish, prodigal, profuse refer to that which exists in abundance and is poured out copiously. Lavish suggests (sometimes excessive) generosity and openhandedness: lavish hospitality; much too lavish. Prodigal suggests wastefulness, improvidence, and reckless impatience of restraint: a prodigal extravagance. Profuse emphasizes abundance, but may suggest overemotionalism, exaggeration, or the like: profuse thanks, compliments, apologies. 3. heap, pour; waste, squander, dissipate.


1, 2. niggardly.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
lavish (ˈlævɪʃ)
 
adj
1.  prolific, abundant, or profuse
2.  generous; unstinting; liberal
3.  extravagant; prodigal; wasteful: lavish expenditure
 
vb
4.  (tr) to give, expend, or apply abundantly, generously, or in profusion
 
[C15: adj use of lavas profusion, from Old French lavasse torrent, from Latin lavāre to wash]
 
'lavisher
 
n
 
'lavishly
 
adv
 
'lavishment
 
n
 
'lavishness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lavish
mid-15c., from M.Fr. lavasse (n.), from O.Fr. lavache "torrent (of rain), deluge," from laver "to wash," from L. lavare "to wash" (see lave). The verb is first recorded 1540s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Inside, the interior is lavishly decorated in an oriental theme-the perfect
  place to see a movie in style.
State industry lavishly paid the best winter mountaineers to paint their
  belching factory smokestacks.
Not only does it serve as a sorely-needed update to books about how dinosaur
  science has changed, but is is lavishly illustrated.
Rich bourgeoisie were able to spend lavishly on construction.
Synonyms
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