leach

1 [leech]
verb (used with object)
1.
to dissolve out soluble constituents from (ashes, soil, etc.) by percolation.
2.
to cause (water or other liquid) to percolate through something.
verb (used without object)
3.
(of ashes, soil, etc.) to undergo the action of percolating water.
4.
to percolate, as water.
noun
5.
the act or process of leaching.
6.
a product or solution obtained by leaching; leachate.
7.
the material leached.
8.
a vessel for use in leaching.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English leche leachate, infusion, probably Old English *læc(e), *lec(e), akin to leccan to wet, moisten, causative of leak

leachable, adjective
leachability, noun
leacher, noun
unleached, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

leach

2 [leech]
noun Nautical.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
leach1 (liːtʃ)
 
vb
1.  to remove or be removed from a substance by a percolating liquid
2.  to lose or cause to lose soluble substances by the action of a percolating liquid
3.  percolate another word for percolate
 
n
4.  the act or process of leaching
5.  a substance that is leached or the constituents removed by leaching
6.  a porous vessel for leaching
 
[C17: variant of obsolete letch to wet, perhaps from Old English leccan to water; related to leak]
 
'leacher1
 
n

leach2 (liːtʃ)
 
n
a variant spelling of leech

Leach (liːtʃ)
 
n
Bernard (Howell). 1887--1979, British potter, born in Hong Kong

leech or leach2 (liːtʃ)
 
n
nautical the after edge of a fore-and-aft sail or either of the vertical edges of a squaresail
 
[C15: of Germanic origin; compare Dutch lijk]
 
leach or leach2
 
n
 
[C15: of Germanic origin; compare Dutch lijk]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

leach
O.E. leccan "to moisten" (see leak). The word disappears, then re-emerges late 18c. in a technological sense in ref. to percolating liquids.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Selling fruits and veggies in boxes that don't leach chemicals into landfills
  sounds equally wonderful.
The more hydrogen ions that leach into the ocean, the more acidic it becomes.
The plastics, batteries and other components leach heavy metals and various
  carcinogenic chemicals into drinking water.
Torrential rains in equatorial regions tend to leach the soils of nutrients.
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