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lectionary

[lek-shuh-ner-ee] /ˈlɛk ʃəˌnɛr i/
noun, plural lectionaries.
1.
a book or a list of lections for reading in a divine service.
Origin
1770-1780
1770-80; < Medieval Latin (liber) lēctiōnārius. See lection, -ary
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for lectionary

lectionary

/ˈlɛkʃənərɪ/
noun (pl) -aries
1.
a book containing readings appointed to be read at divine services
Word Origin
C15: from Church Latin lectiōnārium, from lectiolection
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Encyclopedia Article for lectionary

in Christianity, a book containing portions of the Bible appointed to be read on particular days of the year. The word is also used for the list of such Scripture lessons. The early Christians adopted the Jewish custom of reading extracts from the Old Testament on the sabbath. They soon added extracts from the writings of the Apostles and Evangelists. During the 3rd and 4th centuries, several systems of lessons were devised for churches of various localities. One of the first attempts for a diocese to fix definite readings for special seasons during the year was made by Musaeus of Marseille in the mid-5th century.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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