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legalese

[lee-guh-leez, -lees] /ˌli gəˈliz, -ˈlis/
noun
1.
language containing an excessive amount of legal terminology or of legal jargon.
Origin
1910-1915
1910-15; legal + -ese
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for legalese
  • These three images would be what is known in copyright legalese as derivative works.
  • And those package inserts are written in gibberish legalese, without any useful statistics.
  • The language is dense legalese, often containing double or triple negatives.
  • But such is life under judicial oligarchy, forcing the nation to speak legalese.
  • Under all the legalese is a fundamental clash of values.
  • The commission, in elaborate legalese on impressive parchment, was duly read.
  • The story also links to the formal store return requirements, if legalese is more your thing.
  • Its in such legalese that even a highly educated individual can't comprehend what the heck they're trying to tell you.
  • Plus, the use of legalese created more reliance on attorneys, leading to more time and expense wasted on a file.
  • Hopefully everyone wins, because the only ones who wanted fifty pages of legalese was the regulators.
British Dictionary definitions for legalese

legalese

/ˌliːɡəˈliːz/
noun
1.
the conventional language in which legal documents, etc, are written
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for legalese
n.

"the language of legal documents," 1914, from legal + language name ending -ese.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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legalese in Technology


Dense, pedantic verbiage in a language description, product specification, or interface standard; text that seems designed to obfuscate and requires a language lawyer to parse it. Though hackers are not afraid of high information density and complexity in language (indeed, they rather enjoy both), they share a deep and abiding loathing for legalese; they associate it with deception, suits, and situations in which hackers generally get the short end of the stick.

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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