lenity

[len-i-tee]
noun, plural lenities.
1.
the quality or state of being mild or gentle, as toward others.
2.
a lenient act.

Origin:
1540–50; < Latin lēnītās. See lenis, -ty2

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World English Dictionary
lenity (ˈlɛnɪtɪ)
 
n , pl -ties
the state or quality of being lenient
 
[C16: from Latin lēnitās gentleness, from lēnis soft]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lenity
1540s, from Fr. lenité or directly from L. lenitatem (nom. lenitas), from lenis "soft, mild" (see lenient).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The jury was informed of the factual basis for each charge and the rule of
  lenity does not apply.
Under the rule of lenity, any ambiguity is interpreted to favor the defendant.
Court declines to apply the common law rule of lenity and applies the common
  law no fractions of the day rule.
It said that, for the sake of lenity, a single transaction should not be split
  up into multiple offenses.
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