liar paradox

liar paradox

noun
a logical paradox that results from consideration of statements of the form “This statement is false.” If the statement is true, then it is false, whereas if it is false, then it is true.

Origin:
1935–40

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World English Dictionary
liar paradox
 
n
logic the paradox that this statement is false is true only if it is false and false only if it is true: attributed to Epimenides the Cretan in the form all Cretans are liars

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Computing Dictionary

liar paradox definition

philosophy
A sentence which asserts its own falsity, e.g. "This sentence is false" or "I am lying". These paradoxical assertions are meaningless in the sense that there is nothing in the world which could serve to either support or refute them. Philosophers, of course, have a great deal more to say on the subject.
["The Liar: an Essay on Truth and Circularity", Jon Barwise and John Etchemendy, Oxford University Press (1987). ISBN 0-19-505944-1 (PBK), Library of Congress BC199.P2B37].
(1995-02-22)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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