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limber1

[lim-ber] /ˈlɪm bər/
adjective
1.
characterized by ease in bending the body; supple; lithe.
2.
bending readily; flexible; pliant.
verb (used without object)
3.
to make oneself limber (usually followed by up):
to limber up before the game.
verb (used with object)
4.
to make (something) limber (usually followed by up):
She tried to limber up her wits before the exam.
Origin
1555-1565
1555-65; perhaps akin to limb1
Related forms
limberly, adverb
limberness, noun
Synonyms
2. pliable. See flexible.
Antonyms
1, 2. stiff. 2. rigid, unbending.

limber2

[lim-ber] /ˈlɪm bər/
noun
1.
a two-wheeled vehicle, originally pulled by four or six horses, behind which is towed a field gun or caisson.
verb (used with object)
2.
to attach the limber to (a gun) in preparation for moving away (sometimes followed by up).
verb (used without object)
3.
to attach a limber to a gun (usually followed by up).
Origin
1400-50; late Middle English lymo(u)r pole of a vehicle. See limb1, -er1

limber3

[lim-ber] /ˈlɪm bər/
noun
1.
Usually, limbers. Nautical. a passage or gutter in which seepage collects to be pumped away, located on each side of a central keelson; bilge.
Origin
1620-30; perhaps < French lumière hole, light < Late Latin lūmināria; see luminaria
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for limber
  • limber pine, with flexible twigs and needles in groups of five, may also be a part of subalpine forests.
  • All in all this was light and limber music, played with a casualness that belied its complexity.
  • It might even spur some in the web's paunchier quarters to limber up.
  • While still exacting, he seems mellower, though as limber and kinetic as ever.
  • Use mild stretching exercises to keep them limber and moving.
  • Now he has reported to camp, feeling more limber than he has in years.
  • His limber voice was weaker, but the eyes remained alert.
  • Stand it up to create a hip new office chair that keeps you limber all day long.
  • It's conceivable that these species needed to be so oddly limber while they were still embryos, to curl their necks up in the egg.
  • His muscles are limber, the rhythm steady, and then his shovel hits something not dirt.
British Dictionary definitions for limber

limber1

/ˈlɪmbə/
adjective
1.
capable of being easily bent or flexed; pliant
2.
able to move or bend freely; agile
Derived Forms
limberly, adverb
limberness, noun
Word Origin
C16: origin uncertain

limber2

/ˈlɪmbə/
noun
1.
part of a gun carriage, often containing ammunition, consisting of an axle, pole, and two wheels, that is attached to the rear of an item of equipment, esp field artillery
verb
2.
(usually foll by up) to attach the limber (to a gun, etc)
Word Origin
C15 lymour shaft of a gun carriage, origin uncertain

limber3

/ˈlɪmbə/
noun
1.
(often pl) (nautical) (in the bilge of a vessel) a fore-and-aft channel through a series of holes in the frames (limber holes) where water collects and can be pumped out
Word Origin
C17: probably changed from French lumière hole (literally: light)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for limber
limber
1565, of uncertain origin, possibly from limb on notion of supple boughs of a tree, or from limp "flaccid," or somehow from M.E. lymer "shaft of a cart" (see limber (n.)).
limber
"detachable forepart of a gun carriage," 1480, probably related to Fr. limonière "wagon with two shafts," from limon "shaft," probably of Celtic origin.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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