lizard

[liz-erd]
noun
1.
any of numerous scaly reptiles of the suborder Sauria, order Squamata, typically having a moderately elongate body, a tapering tail, and two pairs of legs held outward from the body, comprising mostly terrestrial and burrowing species.
2.
any of various reptiles resembling a lizard, as a dinosaur or crocodile.
3.
leather made from the skin of the lizard, used for shoes, purses, etc.
4.
(initial capital letter) Astronomy. the constellation Lacerta.
6.
Nautical. a pennant used as a leader for running rigging, having a thimble or bull's-eye.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English liserd, variant of lesard(e) < Middle French lesarde < Latin lacerta

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To lizard
Collins
World English Dictionary
lizard (ˈlɪzəd)
 
n
1.  any reptile of the suborder Lacertilia (or Sauria), esp those of the family Lacertidae (Old World lizards), typically having an elongated body, four limbs, and a long tail: includes the geckos, iguanas, chameleons, monitors, and slow wormsRelated: lacertilian, saurian
2.  a.  leather made from the skin of such an animal
 b.  (as modifier): a lizard handbag
 
Related: lacertilian, saurian
 
[C14: via Old French from Latin lacerta]

Lizard (ˈlɪzəd)
 
n
the Lizard Lizard Head, Also known as: the Lizard Peninsula a promontory in SW England, in SW Cornwall: the southernmost point in Great Britain

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lizard
"an animal resembling a serpent, with legs added to it" [Johnson], late 14c., from Anglo-Fr. lusard, from O.Fr. lesard (fem. laisarde), from L. lacertus (fem. lacerta) "lizard," of unknown origin, perhaps from PIE base *leq- "to bend, twist."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Easton
Bible Dictionary

Lizard definition


Only in Lev. 11:30, as rendering of Hebrew _letaah_, so called from its "hiding." Supposed to be the Lacerta gecko or fan-foot lizard, from the toes of which poison exudes. (See CHAMELEON.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Elsewhere they have gone to court for the blunt-nosed leopard lizard and the
  giant kangaroo rat.
Ectotherms, by contrast, warm their bodies by absorbing heat from their
  surroundings-think of a lizard basking on a rock.
Custom-made boots can be ordered, with fancier skins such as ostrich or lizard
  available for the more extravagant shopper.
See a lizard dart out from behind a shrub and listen to the melodic tunes of
  the meadowlarks.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;