locus

[loh-kuhs]
noun, plural loci [loh-sahy, -kee, -kahy] , loca [loh-kuh] .
1.
a place; locality.
2.
a center or source, as of activities or power: locus of control.
3.
Mathematics. the set of all points, lines, or surfaces that satisfy a given requirement.
4.
Genetics. the chromosomal position of a gene as determined by its linear order relative to the other genes on that chromosome.

Origin:
1525–35; < Latin; OL stlocus a place

Dictionary.com Unabridged

locus classicus

[loh-koos klahs-si-koos; English loh-kuhs klas-i-kuhs]
plural loci classici [loh-kee klahs-si-kee; English loh-sahy klas-uh-sahy, loh-kahy klas-i-kahy] . Latin.
classical source: a passage commonly cited to illustrate or explain a subject or word.

locus in quo

[loh-koos in kwoh; English loh-kuhs in kwoh]
Latin.
the place in which.

locus sigilli

[loh-koos see-geel-lee; English loh-kuhs si-jil-ahy] .
plural loci sigilli [loh-kee see-geel-lee; English loh-sahy si-jil-ahy, loh-kahy] . Latin.
See L.S ( def 3 ).
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
locus (ˈləʊkəs)
 
n , pl loci
1.  (in many legal phrases) a place or area, esp the place where something occurred
2.  maths a set of points whose location satisfies or is determined by one or more specified conditions: the locus of points equidistant from a given point is a circle
3.  genetics the position of a particular gene on a chromosome
 
[C18: Latin]

locus classicus (ˈklæsɪkəs)
 
n , pl loci classici
an authoritative and often quoted passage from a standard work
 
[Latin: classical place]

locus sigilli (sɪˈdʒɪlaɪ)
 
n , pl loci sigilli
the place to which the seal is affixed on legal documents, etc
 
[Latin]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

locus
(pl. loci), 1715, "locality," from L. locus "place," from O.Latin stlocus, lit. "where something is placed," from PIE base *st(h)el- "to cause to stand, to place." Used by L. writers for Gk. topos.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

locus lo·cus (lō'kəs)
n. pl. lo·ci (-sī', -kē, -kī')

  1. A place; site.

  2. The position that a given gene occupies on a chromosome.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
locus   (lō'kəs)  Pronunciation Key 
Plural loci (lō'sī', -kē, -kī')
  1. The set or configuration of all points whose coordinates satisfy a single equation or one or more algebraic conditions.

  2. The position that a given gene occupies on a chromosome.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

locus definition


plur. loci (loh-seye, loh-keye)

In geometry, the set of all points (and only those points) that satisfy certain conditions; these points form a curve or figure. For example, the locus of all points in space one foot from a given point is a sphere having a radius of one foot and having its center at the given point. The locus of all points in a plane one foot from a given point is a circle having a radius of one foot and having its center at the given point.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

Locus definition


A distributed system project supporting transparent access to data through a network-wide file system.

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
My own university was the locus of one set of these scandals.
The locus of the human mystery is perception of this world.
It also shifted the locus of decision-making from locally based citizens to
  distant corporate boards.
Because the locus of world economic power is shifting.
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