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ludicrous

[loo-di-kruh s] /ˈlu dɪ krəs/
adjective
1.
causing laughter because of absurdity; provoking or deserving derision; ridiculous; laughable:
a ludicrous lack of efficiency.
Origin of ludicrous
1610-1620
1610-20; < Latin lūdicrus sportive, equivalent to lūdicr(um) a show, public games (lūdi-, stem of lūdere to play, + -crum noun suffix of instrument or result) + -us -ous
Related forms
ludicrously, adverb
ludicrousness, noun
unludicrous, adjective
unludicrously, adverb
unludicrousness, noun
Synonyms
farcical. See funny1 .
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for ludicrous
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • A most ludicrous incident occurred during our march that night.

    Drum Taps in Dixie Delavan S. Miller
  • "There is a ludicrous side to it which you do not see," he said.

    Ester Ried Yet Speaking Isabella Alden
  • Evidently he believed himself irresistible, and his smirking, posing, and ogling were ludicrous to the last degree.

    Brave Tom Edward S. Ellis
  • His surprise would have been ludicrous but for the seriousness of the situation to all concerned.

    Within the Law Marvin Dana
  • Penny, who had a keen sense of the ludicrous, began to sway to the jungle rhythm.

    Whispering Walls Mildred A. Wirt
British Dictionary definitions for ludicrous

ludicrous

/ˈluːdɪkrəs/
adjective
1.
absurd or incongruous to the point of provoking ridicule or laughter
Derived Forms
ludicrously, adverb
ludicrousness, noun
Word Origin
C17: from Latin lūdicrus done in sport, from lūdus game; related to lūdere to play
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for ludicrous
adj.

1610s, "pertaining to play or sport," from Latin ludicrus, from ludicrum "a sport, game, toy, source of amusement, joke," from ludere "to play," which, with Latin ludus "a game, play," perhaps is from Etruscan, or perhaps from PIE root *leid- "to play." Sense of "ridiculous" is attested from 1782. Related: Ludicrously; ludicrousness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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