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lull

[luhl] /lʌl/
verb (used with object)
1.
to put to sleep or rest by soothing means:
to lull a child by singing.
2.
to soothe or quiet.
3.
to give or lead to feel a false sense of safety; cause to be less alert, aware, or watchful.
verb (used without object)
4.
to quiet down, let up, or subside:
furious activity that finally lulled.
noun
5.
a temporary calm, quiet, or stillness:
a lull in a storm.
6.
a soothing sound:
the lull of falling waters.
7.
a pacified or stupefied condition:
The drug had put him in a lull.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English lullen, of expressive orig.; compare Swedish lulla, German lullen, Latin lallāre to sing lullaby
Related forms
luller, noun
lullingly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for lull
  • Every safety feature tends to lull some people into false sense of security.
  • The reasons for the lull suggest it should be temporary.
  • There is always plenty of work to do at a fossil dig, but every now and then there's a lull in the activity.
  • There are natural places that lull you into a sense of peace.
  • As the sun emerges from a long lull in activity, the star's emissions in the radio band of the spectrum have also picked up.
  • And all these false predictions have served their purpose, to lull humanity into complacency.
  • Later, soak under the stars then let the rushing river lull you to sleep.
  • It definitely hasn't been quiet geologically around the planet, but news about volcanism seems to be in a bit of a lull right now.
  • Should there be a lull in the wind, the dynamos can be used in reverse as electric motors, to keep the generator airborne.
  • These retail tactics lull our brain into buying more things, since the insula is pacified.
British Dictionary definitions for lull

lull

/lʌl/
verb
1.
to soothe (a person or animal) by soft sounds or motions (esp in the phrase lull to sleep)
2.
to calm (someone or someone's fears, suspicions, etc), esp by deception
noun
3.
a short period of calm or diminished activity
Derived Forms
lulling, adjective
Word Origin
C14: possibly imitative of crooning sounds; related to Middle Low German lollen to soothe, Middle Dutch lollen to talk drowsily, mumble
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for lull
v.

early 14c., lullen "hush to sleep," probably imitative of lu-lu sound used to lull a child to sleep (cf. Swedish lulla "to hum a lullaby," German lullen "to rock," Sanskrit lolati "moves to and fro," Middle Dutch lollen "to mutter"). Figurative use from 1570s. Related: Lulled; lulling.

n.

1650s as the name of a soothing drink, from lull (v.). Meaning "period of quiet in a storm" is from 1815.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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