lullaby

[luhl-uh-bahy]
noun, plural lullabies.
1.
a song used to lull a child to sleep; cradlesong.
2.
any lulling song.
verb (used with object), lullabied, lullabying.
3.
to lull with or as with a lullaby.

Origin:
1550–60; equivalent to lulla, lulla(y), interjection used in cradlesongs (late Middle English lullai, lulli) + -by, as in bye-bye

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
lullaby (ˈlʌləˌbaɪ)
 
n , pl -bies
1.  a quiet song to lull a child to sleep
2.  the music for such a song
 
vb , -bies, -bies, -bying, -bied
3.  (tr) to quiet or soothe with or as if with a lullaby
 
[C16: perhaps a blend of lull + goodbye]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lullaby
c.1560, lulley by, from M.E. lollai, lullay, from lullen (see lull). Second element perhaps from by-by "good-by."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Perhaps because it is so universal and commonplace, the lullaby doesn't get
  much respect.
These were the lullaby years, when national security hardly mattered.
It's that long horizon, the soothing oceanic swell-the best lullaby ever
  invented.
All he can do is paint, knock down some rust, and accept his boat's lullaby
  sway.
Synonyms
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