lurch

1 [lurch]
noun
1.
an act or instance of swaying abruptly.
2.
a sudden tip or roll to one side, as of a ship or a staggering person.
3.
an awkward, swaying or staggering motion or gait.
verb (used without object)
4.
(of a ship) to roll or pitch suddenly.
5.
to make a lurch; move with lurches; stagger: The wounded man lurched across the room.

Origin:
1760–70; origin uncertain

lurchingly, adverb


5. lunge, reel, totter.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

lurch

3 [lurch]
verb (used with object)
1.
Archaic. to do out of; defraud; cheat.
2.
Obsolete. to acquire through underhanded means; steal; filch.
verb (used without object)
3.
British Dialect. to lurk near a place; prowl.
noun
4.
Archaic. the act of lurking or state of watchfulness.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English lorchen, apparently variant of lurken to lurk

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
lurch1 (lɜːtʃ)
 
vb
1.  to lean or pitch suddenly to one side
2.  to stagger or sway
 
n
3.  the act or an instance of lurching
 
[C19: origin unknown]
 
'lurching1
 
adj

lurch2 (lɜːtʃ)
 
n
1.  leave someone in the lurch to desert someone in trouble
2.  cribbage the state of a losing player with less than 30 points at the end of a game (esp in the phrase in the lurch)
 
[C16: from French lourche a game similar to backgammon, apparently from lourche (adj) deceived, probably of Germanic origin]

lurch3 (lɜːtʃ)
 
vb
archaic, dialect or (intr) to prowl or steal about suspiciously
 
[C15: perhaps a variant of lurk]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lurch
"sudden pitch to one side," 1819 (in Byron's "Don Juan"), from earlier lee-larch (1769), a nautical term for "sudden violent roll to leeward which a ship often takes in a high sea," perhaps from Fr. lacher "to let go," from L. laxus (see lax).

lurch
"predicament," 1584, from M.E. lurch (v.) "to beat in a game of skill (often by a great many points)," c.1350, probably lit. "to make a complete victory in lorche," a game akin to backgammon, from O.Fr. lourche. The game name is perhaps related to M.E. lurken, lorken "to lie hidden, lie in ambush," or
it may be adopted into Fr. from M.H.G. lurz "left," also "wrong."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
She backed up, then lurched forward again, hitting the cop car one more time.
From there, the plan lurched forward in fits and starts.
Imagine if before you took each step, your guts lurched up into your throat.
He lurched left, lurched right and ended up sprawled face first on the
  sun-toasted, dust-coated hood of a compact car.
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