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macadam

[muh-kad-uh m] /məˈkæd əm/
noun
1.
a macadamized road or pavement.
2.
the broken stone used in making such a road.
Origin
1815-1825
1815-25; named after J. L. McAdam (1756-1836), Scottish engineer who invented it
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for macadam
  • The place was at the end of a sloping driveway that started out as macadam but quickly diminished to dirt and gravel.
  • The macadam ran on straight and narrow, bisecting the spring-green wilderness of fronds.
British Dictionary definitions for macadam

macadam

/məˈkædəm/
noun
1.
a road surface made of compressed layers of small broken stones, esp one that is bound together with tar or asphalt
Word Origin
C19: named after John McAdam (1756–1836), Scottish engineer, the inventor
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for macadam
n.

1824, named for inventor, Scottish civil engineer John L. McAdam (1756-1836), who developed a method of levelling roads and paving them with gravel and outlined the process in his pamphlet "Remarks on the Present System of Road-Making" (1822). Originally, road material consisting of a solid mass of stones of nearly uniform size laid down in layers; he did not approve of the use of binding materials or rollers. The idea of mixing tar with the gravel began 1880s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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