macaroni

[mak-uh-roh-nee]
noun, plural macaronis, macaronies for 2.
1.
small, tubular pasta prepared from wheat flour.
2.
an English dandy of the 18th century who affected Continental mannerisms, clothes, etc.
Also, maccaroni.


Origin:
1590–1600; earlier maccaroni < dialectal Italian, plural of maccarone (Italian maccherone). See macaroon

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Collins
World English Dictionary
macaroni or maccaroni (ˌmækəˈrəʊnɪ)
 
n , pl -nis, -nies
1.  pasta tubes made from wheat flour
2.  (in 18th-century Britain) a dandy who affected foreign manners and style
 
[C16: from Italian (Neapolitan dialect) maccarone, probably from Greek makaria food made from barley]
 
maccaroni or maccaroni
 
n
 
[C16: from Italian (Neapolitan dialect) maccarone, probably from Greek makaria food made from barley]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

macaroni
1599, from southern It. dialect maccaroni (It. maccheroni), pl. of *maccarone, possibly from maccare "bruise, batter, crush," of unknown origin, or from late Gk. makaria "food made from barley." Used after c.1764 to mean "fop, dandy" (the "Yankee Doodle" reference) because it was an exotic dish at a
time when certain young men who had traveled the continent were affecting Fr. and It. fashions and accents. There is said to have been a Macaroni Club in Britain, which was the immediate source of the term.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

macaroni

in art, Late Paleolithic finger tracings in clay. It is one of the oldest and simplest known forms of art. Innumerable examples appear on the walls and ceilings of limestone caves in France and Spain (see Franco-Cantabrian art), the oldest dating back about 30,000 years. Examples of the form range from simple scratchings and jumbled, apparently aimless lines to deliberate meanders, arabesques, and outline drawings of animals and humans.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
It is not good news that more people are eating macaroni and cheese and smoking
  cigarettes.
Being the animal that finds and eats the old macaroni is not.
Arrange alternate layers of cold, cooked sliced chicken and boiled macaroni or
  rice.
Macaroni penguins form such a close bond with their mates that they can
  identify a mate's voice in a crowded colony.
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