magnesia

magnesia

[mag-nee-zhuh, -shuh]


Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English: philosophers' stone < Medieval Latin magnēsia < Greek () Magnēsía (líthos) (the stone) of Magnesia; sense development obscure

magnesian, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

Magnesia

[mag-nee-shee-uh, -zhee-uh]
noun
ancient name of Manisa.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
magnesia (mæɡˈniːʃə)
 
n
another name for magnesium oxide
 
[C14: via Medieval Latin from Greek Magnēsia, of Magnēs ancient mineral-rich region]
 
mag'nesian
 
adj
 
magnesic
 
adj
 
mag'nesial
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

magnesia
late 14c., in alchemy, "main ingredient of the philosopher's stone," from M.L. magnesia, from Gk. (he) Magnesia (lithos) "the lodestone," lit. "(the) Magnesian (stone)," from Magnesia, region in Thessaly. Perhaps manganese is meant. Connection with magnet is obscure. Main modern sense of "magnesium oxide"
(1755) is perhaps an independent formation from L. magnes carneus "flesh-magnet" (c.1550), so called because it adheres strongly to the lips.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

magnesia mag·ne·sia (māg-nē'zhə, -shə)
n.
magnesium oxide.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
magnesia   (māg-nē'zhə)  Pronunciation Key 
A white powder with a very high melting point. It is used to make heat-resistant materials, electrical insulators, cements, fertilizer, and plastics. It is also used in medicine as an antacid and laxative. Chemical formula: MgO.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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