magnetron

[mag-ni-tron]
noun Electronics.
a two-element vacuum tube in which the flow of electrons is under the influence of an external magnetic field, used to generate extremely short radio waves.

Origin:
1920–25; magne(to)- + -tron

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World English Dictionary
magnetron (ˈmæɡnɪˌtrɒn)
 
n
an electronic valve with two coaxial electrodes used with an applied magnetic field to generate high-power microwave oscillations, esp for use in radar
 
[C20: from magnet + electron]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
magnetron   (māg'nĭ-trŏn')  Pronunciation Key 
An electron tube that produces coherent microwave radiation. Magnetrons are diodes in which the electrons traveling to the anode are set in spiraling paths by a magnetic field created by permanent magnets. The circular component of the electrons' motion causes microwave-frequency oscillations in the voltage induced in resonating cavities built into the anode, which is connected to an antenna that emits the microwaves. Magnetrons are used in radar and in microwave ovens.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

magnetron

diode vacuum tube consisting of a cylindrical (straight wire) cathode and a coaxial anode, between which a dc (direct current) potential creates an electric field. A magnetic field is applied longitudinally by an external magnet. Connected to a resonant line, it can act as an oscillator. Magnetrons are capable of generating extremely high frequencies and also short bursts of very high power. They are an important source of power in radar systems and in microwave ovens.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
His laboratory produced the magnetron, an invention that greatly improved the
  efficiency of radar.
Thus, things turn full circle, for the original microwave oven was based on the
  magnetron from a military radar.
The frequency offset curve shows that initial magnetron thermal drift ends with
  frequency lock.
The air from the magnetron cooling will then be re-directed to the exterior.
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