malicious

[muh-lish-uhs]
adjective
1.
full of, characterized by, or showing malice; malevolent; spiteful: malicious gossip.
2.
Law. vicious, wanton, or mischievous in motivation or purpose.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English malicius < Old French < Latin malitiōsus. See malice, -ous

maliciously, adverb
maliciousness, noun
nonmalicious, adjective
nonmaliciously, adverb
nonmaliciousness, noun
quasi-malicious, adjective
quasi-maliciously, adverb
semimalicious, adjective
semimaliciously, adverb
semimaliciousness, noun
unmalicious, adjective
unmaliciously, adverb
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
malicious (məˈlɪʃəs)
 
adj
1.  characterized by malice
2.  motivated by wrongful, vicious, or mischievous purposes
 
ma'liciously
 
adv
 
ma'liciousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

malicious
early 13c., from O.Fr. malicius "showing ill will," from L. malitiosus "wicked, malicious," from malitia "badness, ill will, spite," from malus "bad" (see mal-). In legal use (early 14c., Anglo-Fr.), it means "characterized by malice prepense." Related: Maliciously; maliciousness.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Some people are just malicious I suppose.
Tales of actors' career trajectories are informative without being malicious.
The accidental delinquent acts impulsively and without malicious forethought.
These are the types of files that most often contain malicious code.
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