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mandamus

[man-dey-muh s] /mænˈdeɪ məs/ Law.
noun, plural mandamuses.
1.
a writ from a superior court to an inferior court or to an officer, corporation, etc., commanding that a specified thing be done.
verb (used with object)
2.
to intimidate or serve with such writ.
Origin of mandamus
< Latin mandāmus we command
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the web for mandamus
  • The purpose of a mandamus action is to compel an official to perform his or her duty.
British Dictionary definitions for mandamus

mandamus

/mænˈdeɪməs/
noun (pl) -muses
1.
(law) formerly a writ from, now an order of, a superior court commanding an inferior tribunal, public official, corporation, etc, to carry out a public duty
Word Origin
C16: Latin, literally: we command, from mandāre to command
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for mandamus
n.

1530s, "writ from a superior court to an inferior one, specifying that something be done," (late 14c. in Anglo-French), from Latin, literally "we order," first person plural present indicative of mandare "to order" (see mandate (n.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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