manna

[man-uh]
noun
1.
the food miraculously supplied to the Israelites in the wilderness. Ex. 16:14–36.
2.
any sudden or unexpected help, advantage, or aid to success.
3.
divine or spiritual food.
4.
the exudation of the ash Fraxinus ornus and related plants: source of mannitol.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English, Old English < Late Latin < Greek mánna < Hebrew mān

manna, manner, manor.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
manna (ˈmænə)
 
n
1.  Old Testament the miraculous food which sustained the Israelites in the wilderness (Exodus 16:14--36)
2.  any spiritual or divine nourishment
3.  a windfall; an unexpected gift (esp in the phrase manna from heaven)
4.  a sweet substance obtained from various plants, esp from an ash tree, Fraxinus ornus (manna or flowering ash) of S Europe, used as a mild laxative
 
[Old English via Late Latin from Greek, from Hebrew mān]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

manna
O.E. borrowing from L.L. manna, from Gk. manna, from Heb. man, probably lit. "substance exuded by the tamarisk tree," but used in Gk. and L. specifically with ref. to the substance miraculously supplied to the Children of Israel during their wandering in the Wilderness (Ex. xvi.15). Meaning "spiritual
nourishment" is attested from 1382.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Manna definition


Heb. man-hu, "What is that?" the name given by the Israelites to the food miraculously supplied to them during their wanderings in the wilderness (Ex. 16:15-35). The name is commonly taken as derived from _man_, an expression of surprise, "What is it?" but more probably it is derived from _manan_, meaning "to allot," and hence denoting an "allotment" or a "gift." This "gift" from God is described as "a small round thing," like the "hoar-frost on the ground," and "like coriander seed," "of the colour of bdellium," and in taste "like wafers made with honey." It was capable of being baked and boiled, ground in mills, or beaten in a mortar (Ex. 16:23; Num. 11:7). If any was kept over till the following morning, it became corrupt with worms; but as on the Sabbath none fell, on the preceding day a double portion was given, and that could be kept over to supply the wants of the Sabbath without becoming corrupt. Directions concerning the gathering of it are fully given (Ex. 16:16-18, 33; Deut. 8:3, 16). It fell for the first time after the eighth encampment in the desert of Sin, and was daily furnished, except on the Sabbath, for all the years of the wanderings, till they encamped at Gilgal, after crossing the Jordan, when it suddenly ceased, and where they "did eat of the old corn of the land; neither had the children of Israel manna any more" (Josh. 5:12). They now no longer needed the "bread of the wilderness." This manna was evidently altogether a miraculous gift, wholly different from any natural product with which we are acquainted, and which bears this name. The manna of European commerce comes chiefly from Calabria and Sicily. It drops from the twigs of a species of ash during the months of June and July. At night it is fluid and resembles dew, but in the morning it begins to harden. The manna of the Sinaitic peninsula is an exudation from the "manna-tamarisk" tree (Tamarix mannifera), the el-tarfah of the Arabs. This tree is found at the present day in certain well-watered valleys in the peninsula of Sinai. The manna with which the people of Israel were fed for forty years differs in many particulars from all these natural products. Our Lord refers to the manna when he calls himself the "true bread from heaven" (John 6:31-35; 48-51). He is also the "hidden manna" (Rev. 2:17; comp. John 6:49,51).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

manna

in biblical literature, one or more of the foods that sustained the Hebrews during the 40 years that intervened between their Exodus from Egypt and their arrival in the Promised Land. The word is perhaps derived from the question man hu? ("What is it?"), asked by the Hebrews when they first tasted the substances that they found growing or deposited by the wind on the arid land that they inhabited. The manna was gathered and was used in part to prepare bread, and it was therefore referred to as "bread from heaven."

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
These capsule reviews are manna for any aspiring food and social historian.
Perhaps they do believe in manna from heaven after all.
For avid sports bettors, this kind of thing is manna.
No matter who is right, neither of you have the mental manna or free time to
  screw around.
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