mansuetude

mansuetude

[man-swi-tood, -tyood]
noun
mildness; gentleness: the mansuetude of Christian love.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin mānsuētūdō tameness, mildness, equivalent to mānsuē-, base of mānsuēscere to become tame, mild (man(us) hand + suēscere to become accustomed) + -tūdō -tude

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mansuetude (ˈmænswɪˌtjuːd)
 
n
archaic gentleness or mildness
 
[C14: from Latin mansuētūdō, from mansuētus, past participle of mansuēscere to make tame by handling, from manus hand + suescēre to train]

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Word Origin & History

mansuetude
"tameness, gentleness, mildness," late 14c., from L. mansuetudo "tameness," from mansuetus, pp. of mansuescere "to tame," lit. "to accustom to the hand," from manus "hand" (see manual) + suescere "to accustom, habituate," from PIE *swdh-sko-, from base *s(w)e- (see idiom).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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