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manticore

[man-ti-kawr, -kohr] /ˈmæn tɪˌkɔr, -ˌkoʊr/
noun
1.
a legendary monster with a man's head, horns, a lion's body, and the tail of a dragon or, sometimes, a scorpion.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English < Latin mantichōrās < Greek, erroneous reading for martichṓras < Iranian; compare Old Persian martiya- man, Avestan xvar- devour, Persian mardom-khar < man-eating; probably ultimately alluding to the tiger, once common in the Caspian Sea region
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for manticore

manticore

/ˈmæntɪˌkɔː/
noun
1.
a monster with a lion's body, a scorpion's tail, and a man's head with three rows of teeth. It roamed the jungles of India and, like the Sphinx, would ask travellers a riddle and kill them when they failed to answer it
Word Origin
C21: from Latin manticora, from Greek mantichōrās, corruption of martichorās, from Persian mardkhora man-eater
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for manticore
n.

fabulous monster with the body of a lion, head of a man, porcupine quills, and tail or sting of a scorpion, c.1300, from Latin manticora, from Greek mantikhoras, corruption of martikhoras, perhaps from Iranian compound *mar-tiya-khvara "man-eater;" cf. Old Persian maritya- "man" (from PIE *mar-t-yo-, from *mer- "to die," thus "mortal, human;" see mortal (adj.)) + kvar- "to eat," from PIE root *swel- (1) "to eat, drink" (see swallow (v.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for manticore

mantichora

a legendary animal having the head of a man (often with horns), the body of a lion, and the tail of a dragon or scorpion. The earliest Greek report of the creature is probably a greatly distorted description of the Caspian tiger, a hypothesis that accords well with the presumed source of the Greek word, an Old Iranian compound meaning "man-eater." Medieval writers used the manticore as a symbol of the devil. In Canadian author Robertson Davies's The Manticore (1972), the protagonist dreams of a sibyl leading a manticore and examines his dream under Jungian analysis

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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