maraud

maraud

[muh-rawd]
verb (used without object)
1.
to roam or go around in quest of plunder; make a raid for booty: Freebooters were marauding all across the territory.
verb (used with object)
2.
to raid for plunder (often used passively): At the war's end the country had been marauded by returning bands of soldiers.
noun
3.
Archaic. the act of marauding.

Origin:
1705–15; < French marauder, derivative of maraud rogue, vagabond, Middle French, perhaps identical with dial. maraud tomcat, of expressive orig.

marauder, noun


1, 2. invade, attack; ravage, harry.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To maraud
Collins
World English Dictionary
maraud (məˈrɔːd)
 
vb
1.  to wander or raid in search of plunder
 
n
2.  an archaic word for foray
 
[C18: from French marauder to prowl, from maraud vagabond]
 
ma'rauder
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

maraud
1690s, from Fr. marauder, from M.Fr. maraud "rascal," probably from Fr. dial. maraud "tomcat," echoic of its cry. A word popularized during the Thirty Years War (cf. Sp. merodear, Ger. marodiren "to maraud," marodebruder "straggler, deserter") by punning association with Count Mérode, imperialist
general. Related: Marauder; marauding.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;