mason

[mey-suhn]
noun
1.
a person whose trade is building with units of various natural or artificial mineral products, as stones, bricks, cinder blocks, or tiles, usually with the use of mortar or cement as a bonding agent.
2.
a person who dresses stones or bricks.
3.
(initial capital letter) a Freemason.
verb (used with object)
4.
to construct of or strengthen with masonry.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English machun, mason < Old French machun, masson < Frankish *makjon maker, derivative of *makōn to make1

nonmason, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged

Mason

[mey-suhn]
noun
1.
Bobbie Ann, born 1940, U.S. short-story writer and novelist.
2.
Charles, 1730–87, English astronomer and surveyor. Compare Mason-Dixon line.
3.
George, 1725–92, American statesman.
4.
Lowell, 1792–1872, U.S. hymnist and educator.
5.
a male given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
mason (ˈmeɪsən)
 
n
1.  a person skilled in building with stone
2.  a person who dresses stone
 
vb
3.  (tr) to construct or strengthen with masonry
 
[C13: from Old French masson, of Frankish origin; perhaps related to Old English macian to make]

Mason (ˈmeɪsən)
 
n
short for Freemason

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

mason
c.1200, from O.Fr. masson (O.N.Fr. machun), probably from Frankish *makjo (cf. O.H.G. steinmezzo "stone mason," related to mahhon "to make;" see make (v.)). But it also may be from, or influenced by, M.L. machio, matio (7c.) which is said by Isidore to be derived from machina
(see machine). The word also may be from the root of L. maceria "wall." Meaning "a Freemason" is attested from early 15c. in Anglo-French.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Mason definition


an artificer in stone. The Tyrians seem to have been specially skilled in architecture (1 Kings 5:17, 18; 2 Sam. 5:11). This art the Hebrews no doubt learned in Egypt (Ex. 1:11, 14), where ruins of temples and palaces fill the traveller with wonder at the present day.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
Mason told everyone to clear out of the way while he tried to disarm the device.
Wire basket and mason jars become outdoor chandelier.
The painting was done with a palette knife-its thick, crude slabs of paint suggesting the handiwork of a mason or plasterer.
On one long wall are shelves that contain mason jar after mason jar of pickled copepods.
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