matter-of-fact

[mat-er-uhv-fakt]
adjective
1.
adhering strictly to fact; not imaginative; prosaic; dry; commonplace: a matter-of-fact account of the political rally.
2.
direct or unemotional; straightforward; down-to-earth.

Origin:
1705–15

matter-of-factly, adverb
matter-of-factness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

matter-of-fact
also matter of fact, 1570s, originally a legal term (translating L. res facti), "that portion of an enquiry concerned with the truth or falsehood of alleged facts," opposed to matter of law. Meaning "prosaic, unimaginative" is from 1787.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Your writing style is spare and matter-of-fact, almost impressionistic.
Savoy exudes nothing more than a cool, matter-of-fact efficiency.
Levine is matter-of-fact about his financial standing.
We're both discerning and straightforward and want our films to have a simple,
  matter-of-fact tone.
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