maundy-money

maundy

[mawn-dee]
noun
1.
the ceremony of washing the feet of the poor, especially commemorating Jesus' washing of His disciples' feet on Maundy Thursday.
2.
Also called maundy money. money distributed as alms in conjunction with the ceremony of maundy or on Maundy Thursday.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English maunde < Old French mande < Latin mandātum command, mandate (from the opening phrase novum mandātum (Vulgate) of Jesus' words to the disciples after He had washed their feet). See mandate

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maundy (ˈmɔːndɪ)
 
n , pl maundies
Christianity the ceremonial washing of the feet of poor persons in commemoration of Jesus' washing of his disciples' feet (John 13:4--34) re-enacted in some churches on Maundy Thursday
 
[C13: from Old French mandé something commanded, from Latin mandatum commandment, from the words of Christ: Mandātum novum dō vōbīs A new commandment give I unto you]

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