follow Dictionary.com

Get the details behind our redesign

mete1

[meet] /mit/
verb (used with object), meted, meting.
1.
to distribute or apportion by measure; allot; dole (usually followed by out):
to mete out punishment.
2.
Archaic. to measure.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English; Old English metan; cognate with Dutch meten, Old Norse meta, Gothic mitan, German messen to measure, Greek mḗdesthai to ponder
Related forms
unmeted, adjective
Synonyms
1. deal, measure, parcel.

mete2

[meet] /mit/
noun
1.
a limiting mark.
2.
a limit or boundary.
Origin
1275-1325; Middle English < Middle French < Latin mēta goal, turning post
Synonyms
2. bound.

Met.E.

1.
metallurgical engineer.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples for mete
  • Carter's moral code of family loyalty propels him to mete out brutal and exacting revenge.
  • Commanding officers have become increasingly reluctant to hold courts martial, or to mete out stiff penalties when they do.
  • Some mechanism must be put in place to mete out a national punishment for those horrible atrocities.
  • It would be far better to conduct investigations and mete out punishments at the national level.
  • For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again.
  • With what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again.
  • Jeans-clad alchemists mete out grains and hops while kettles boil.
  • Based on news reports, if true, he deserves the harsh penalty the law will mete out to him.
  • Next month the judge will mete out a sentence that could mean a lifetime in prison.
  • These fellows are irritated because they can't discover who opposes them and mete out appropriate punishment.
British Dictionary definitions for mete

mete1

/miːt/
verb (transitive)
1.
(usually foll by out) (formal) to distribute or allot (something, often unpleasant)
verb, noun
2.
(poetic, dialect) (to) measure
Word Origin
Old English metan; compare Old Saxon metan, Old Norse meta, German messen to measure

mete2

/miːt/
noun
1.
(rare) a mark, limit, or boundary (esp in the phrase metes and bounds)
Word Origin
C15: from Old French, from Latin mēta goal, turning post (in race)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for mete
mete
O.E. metan "to measure" (class V strong verb; past tense mæt, pp. meten), from P.Gmc. *metanan (cf. O.Fris., O.N. meta, Du. meten, Ger. messen, Goth. mitan "to measure"), probably ultimately from the same PIE base as meter. Only used now with out. Related: Meted; meting.
mete
"boundary," now only in phrase metes and bounds, 1471, from O.Fr. mete, from L. meta "goal, boundary."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of The Day

Difficulty index for mete

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for mete

6
7
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with mete