midsummer

[mid-suhm-er, -suhm-]
noun
1.
the middle of summer.
2.
the summer solstice, around June 21.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English, Old English midsumer. See mid1, summer1

midsummery, adjective
premidsummer, noun, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
midsummer (ˈmɪdˈsʌmə)
 
n
1.  a.  the middle or height of the summer
 b.  (as modifier): a midsummer carnival
2.  another name for summer solstice

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

midsummer
O.E. midsumor, from mid "mid" + sumor "summer." Midsummer Day, as an English quarter-day, was June 24. Astronomically June 21, but traditionally reckoned in Europe on the night of June 23-24.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Midwinter, rather than midsummer, is more likely to be a time of settled
  weather.
By midsummer, they were able to paddle through slivers of open water.
The smell is a mélange of midsummer corpse with fried-liver overtones and a
  distinct fecal note.
They were taken at night by midsummer light, with a large-format camera and
  exposures of up to several minutes.
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