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midsummer

[mid-suhm-er, -suhm-] /ˈmɪdˈsʌm ər, -ˌsʌm-/
noun
1.
the middle of summer.
2.
the summer solstice, around June 21.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English, Old English midsumer. See mid1, summer1
Related forms
midsummery, adjective
premidsummer, noun, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for midsummer
  • Midwinter, rather than midsummer, is more likely to be a time of settled weather.
  • By midsummer, they were able to paddle through slivers of open water.
  • The smell is a mélange of midsummer corpse with fried-liver overtones and a distinct fecal note.
  • They were taken at night by midsummer light, with a large-format camera and exposures of up to several minutes.
  • He cast doubt on the general's data, which showed a steep decline in violent incidents beginning in midsummer.
  • Even in midsummer, when the days are almost without nightfall, the sea there is gray and kicks up whitecaps.
  • Most trees that have dropped leaves prematurely usually produce new shoots and leaves by midsummer.
  • midsummer yellowing and wilting of foliage high in the crown.
  • Observations indicate that families may join together into midsummer flocks.
  • Symptoms develop on the current year's foliage and are often evident by midsummer.
British Dictionary definitions for midsummer

midsummer

/ˈmɪdˈsʌmə/
noun
1.
  1. the middle or height of the summer
  2. (as modifier): a midsummer carnival
2.
another name for summer solstice
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for midsummer
n.

Old English midsumor, from mid + sumor "summer" (see summer (n.1)). Midsummer Day, as an English quarter-day, was June 24. Astronomically June 21, but traditionally reckoned in Europe on the night of June 23-24.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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