mister

1 [mis-ter]
noun
1.
(initial capital letter) a conventional title of respect for a man, prefixed to the name and to certain official designations (usually written as the abbreviation Mr. ).
2.
Informal. sir (used in direct address and not followed by the name of the man addressed): Mister, is this your umbrella?
3.
(initial capital letter) a title prefixed to a mock surname that is used to represent possession of a particular attribute, identity, etc.: Mister Know-it-all.
4.
the informal or social title used in addressing a military warrant officer or any naval officer below the rank of commander.
5.
a.
a term of respect used by cadets in addressing upperclassmen: used with surname.
b.
a term of disparagement used by upperclassmen in addressing cadets: Mister, tuck in that shirttail!
6.
Older Use. husband: You and the mister staying long?
verb (used with object)
7.
to address or speak of as “mister” or “Mr.”

Origin:
1545–55; variant of master

Dictionary.com Unabridged

mister

2 [mis-ter]
noun
a spray, nozzle, or similar device for misting plants.

Origin:
mist + -er1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To mister
Collins
World English Dictionary
mister (ˈmɪstə)
 
n
1.  an informal form of address for a man
2.  navy
 a.  the official form of address for subordinate or senior warrant officers
 b.  the official form of address for all officers in a merchant ship, other than the captain
 c.  (US) navy the official form of address used by the commanding officer to his officers, esp to the more junior
3.  (Brit) the form of address for a surgeon
4.  the form of address for officials holding certain positions: mister chairman
 
vb
5.  informal (tr) to call (someone) mister
 
[C16: variant of master]

Mister (ˈmɪstə)
 
n
the full form of Mr

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

mister
as a title of courtesy before a man's Christian name, 1447, unaccented variant of master.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
There is no need for you to be so confounded impatient, mister.
But if those moons wander off into some elliptical orbit, we're not chasing
  after them, mister.
The evaporator or mister should be vented to the outdoor air, not indoors.
The addition of a hummingbird feeder or water mister can keep the ruby-throated
  wonders around from mid-spring to early fall.
Synonyms
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;