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mock-heroic

[mok-hi-roh-ik] /ˈmɒk hɪˈroʊ ɪk/
adjective
1.
imitating or burlesquing that which is heroic, as in manner, character, or action:
mock-heroic dignity.
2.
of or pertaining to a form of satire in which trivial subjects, characters, and events are treated in the ceremonious manner and with the elevated language and elaborate devices characteristic of the heroic style.
noun
3.
an imitation or burlesque of something heroic.
Origin
1705-1715
1705-15
Related forms
mock-heroically, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for mock-heroic
  • She could not help laughing at his mock-heroic look and tone.
British Dictionary definitions for mock-heroic

mock-heroic

adjective
1.
(of a literary work, esp a poem) imitating the style of heroic poetry in order to satirize an unheroic subject, as in Pope's The Rape of the Lock
noun
2.
burlesque imitation of the heroic style or of a single work in this style
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Encyclopedia Article for mock-heroic

mock-epic

form of satire that adapts the elevated heroic style of the classical epic poem to a trivial subject. The tradition, which originated in classical times with an anonymous burlesque of Homer, the Batrachomyomachia (Battle of the Frogs and the Mice), was honed to a fine art in the late 17th- and early 18th-century Neoclassical period. A double-edged satirical weapon, the mock-epic was sometimes used by the "moderns" of this period to ridicule contemporary "ancients" (classicists). More often it was used by "ancients" to point up the unheroic character of the modern age by subjecting thinly disguised contemporary events to a heroic treatment. The classic example of this is Nicolas Boileau's Le Lutrin (1674-83; "The Lectern"), which begins with a quarrel between two ecclesiastical dignitaries about where to place a lectern in a chapel and ends with a battle in a bookstore in which champions of either side hurl their favourite "ancient" or "modern" authors at each other. Jonathan Swift's "Battle of the Books" (1704) is a variation of this theme in mock-heroic prose. The outstanding English mock-epic is Alexander Pope's brilliant tour de force The Rape of the Lock (1712-14), which concerns a society beau's theft of a lock of hair from a society belle; Pope treated the incident as if it were comparable to events that sparked the Trojan War.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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12
14
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