monograph

[mon-uh-graf, -grahf]
noun
1.
a treatise on a particular subject, as a biographical study or study of the works of one artist.
2.
a highly detailed and thoroughly documented study or paper written about a limited area of a subject or field of inquiry: scholarly monographs on medieval pigments.
3.
an account of a single thing or class of things, as of a species of organism.
verb (used with object)
4.
to write a monograph about.

Origin:
1815–25; mono- + -graph

monographer [muh-nog-ruh-fer] , monographist, noun
monographic [mon-uh-graf-ik] , monographical, adjective
monographically, adverb

monogram, monograph.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
monograph (ˈmɒnəˌɡrɑːf, -ˌɡræf)
 
n
1.  a paper, book, or other work concerned with a single subject or aspect of a subject
 
vb
2.  (tr) to write a monograph on
 
monographer
 
n
 
mo'nographist
 
n
 
mono'graphic
 
adj
 
mono'graphically
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

monograph
1821, "treatise on a single subject," from mono- + graph "something written."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Nothing makes an author and the author's publisher unhappy more easily than big
  dreams for a small monograph.
The last plate in the monograph demonstrated how different the new dinosaur was.
The result is a weak monograph that would have made a great research article.
The same pages of a historical novel or a well-written monograph is fine.
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