monoplane

[mon-uh-pleyn]
noun
1.
an airplane with one main sustaining surface or one set of wings.
2.
Nautical. a planing craft the bottom of which is in an unbroken fore-and-aft line.

Origin:
1905–10; mono- + plane1

monoplanist, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
monoplane (ˈmɒnəʊˌpleɪn)
 
n
Compare biplane an aeroplane with only one pair of wings

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

monoplane
1907, coined from mono- + (aero)plane. In old planes the wings formed a single surface running across the fuselage.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

monoplane

type of aircraft with a single pair of wings. The monoplane design has been nearly universally adopted over multiplane configurations because airflow interference between adjacent wings reduces efficiency. The first monoplane was constructed by the Romanian inventor Trajan Vuia, who made a flight of 12 m (40 feet) on March 18, 1906. Louis Bleriot of France built a monoplane in 1907 and flew it across the English Channel two years later. Monoplane design proved itself conclusively during World War II, and since then the craft has completely supplanted the biplane except for special purposes. Compare biplane.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
They measured monoplane, biplane, and triplane wing models.
It was a wire-braced low-wing monoplane constructed largely of steel tubing.
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