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monotonous

[muh-not-n-uh s] /məˈnɒt n əs/
adjective
1.
lacking in variety; tediously unvarying:
the monotonous flat scenery.
2.
characterizing a sound continuing on one note.
3.
having very little inflection; limited to a narrow pitch range.
Origin
1770-1780
1770-80; < Late Greek monótonos. See mono-, tone, -ous
Related forms
monotonously, adverb
monotonousness, noun
unmonotonous, adjective
unmonotonously, adverb
Can be confused
monotonic, monotonous.
Synonyms
1. tedious, humdrum, boring, dull.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for monotonous
  • Everyone has had the mindless slipup during a monotonous task.
  • The only sound is a monotonous, liquid drone.
  • And a speaking voice as monotonous as a shower on a windless day.
  • This type of situation is occuring now with an almost monotonous regularity.
  • At Calgary's airport, a whopping 73% of employees left the apparently monotonous but stressful job.
  • All this means that wine is in danger of becoming “increasingly industrial, increasingly monotonous”.
  • Thus, her palette of soft greyish browns never grows monotonous.
  • And it's not just me: op-ed columns have started to complain about his lack of audible passion and his monotonous cadences.
  • If we all wrote about our childhood forever, books would be rather monotonous.
  • After a while, it just gets monotonous seeing them always win.
British Dictionary definitions for monotonous

monotonous

/məˈnɒtənəs/
adjective
1.
dull and tedious, esp because of repetition
2.
unvarying in pitch or cadence
Derived Forms
monotonously, adverb
monotonousness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for monotonous
adj.

1750, of sound, from Greek monotonos "of one tone" (see monotony). Transferred and figurative use, "lacking in variety, uninteresting," is from 1783. Related: Monotonously.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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