moribund

[mawr-uh-buhnd, mor-]
adjective
1.
in a dying state; near death.
2.
on the verge of extinction or termination.
3.
not progressing or advancing; stagnant: a moribund political party.

Origin:
1715–25; < Latin moribundus dying, equivalent to mori- (stem of morī to die) + -bundus adj. suffix

moribundity, noun
moribundly, adverb
unmoribund, adjective
unmoribundly, adverb
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World English Dictionary
moribund (ˈmɒrɪˌbʌnd)
 
adj
1.  near death
2.  stagnant; without force or vitality
 
[C18: from Latin, from morī to die]
 
mori'bundity
 
n
 
'moribundly
 
adv

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

moribund
1721, "about to die," from Fr. moribund (16c.), from L. moribundus "dying," from mori "to die" (see mortal). Fig. sense of "near an end" is from 1837.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

moribund mor·i·bund (môr'ə-bŭnd')
n.
At the point of death; dying.


mor'i·bun'di·ty (-bŭn'dĭ-tē) n.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
The point is that their slick, prosperous world is in fact moribund, so corrupt
  and monstrous that it is rotting on its feet.
Economies become moribund but a powerful, humane idea never dies.
It's the brightest spot on the landscape of a man who sees everything else as
  moribund.
Italy's economy is stagnant, its businesses depressed—and its reforms
  moribund.
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