morose

[muh-rohs]
adjective
1.
gloomily or sullenly ill-humored, as a person or mood.
2.
characterized by or expressing gloom.

Origin:
1555–65; < Latin mōrōsus fretful, peevish, willful, equivalent to mōr- (stem of mōs) will, inclination + -ōsus -ose1

morosely, adverb
moroseness, morosity [muh-ros-i-tee] , noun
supermorose, adjective
supermorosely, adverb
supermoroseness, noun
unmorose, adjective
unmorosely, adverb
unmoroseness, noun


1. moody, sour, sulky, surly. See glum.


1. cheerful.
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World English Dictionary
morose (məˈrəʊs)
 
adj
ill-tempered or gloomy
 
[C16: from Latin mōrōsus peevish, capricious, from mōs custom, will, caprice]
 
mo'rosely
 
adv
 
mo'roseness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

morose
1530s "gloomy," from L. morosus "morose, peevish, fastidious," from mos (gen. moris) "habit, custom" (see moral). In English, manners by itself means "(good) manners," but here the implication in Latin is "(bad) manners."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He was unusually morose, even for a man who is usually morose.
I've been so morose today, thinking of everything I failed at.
Audiences also loved this biopic, which is loosely based on the life of a
  morose comic-book creator.
If he were less peevish and morose, all would be well.
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