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mozo

[moh-zoh] /ˈmoʊ zoʊ/
noun, plural mozos. Southwestern U.S.
1.
a waiter or male household servant.
Origin of mozo
1830-1840
1830-40; < Spanish: literally, youth, servant, of obscure origin
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for mozo
Historical Examples
  • Seyd concluded a diatribe on the Mexican mozo in general while they were dressing.

    The Mystery of The Barranca Herman Whitaker
  • The mozo in charge of the corrals dragged the carcass to the superintendent's office.

    The Killer Stewart Edward White
  • This excites the surprise of our mozo, or servant, and the other men in our employ.

    Mexico Charles Reginald Enock
  • Consenting that he should accompany, we began to seek a mozo, as guide to Chila.

    In Indian Mexico (1908) Frederick Starr
  • We could not begin work until the mozo came with the instruments.

    In Indian Mexico (1908) Frederick Starr
  • All but the mozo were mounted on horses, more or less good or bad.

    In Indian Mexico (1908) Frederick Starr
  • He glanced around him for the water-hole beside which he had lain down to sleep and await the mozo and the burros.

    The Long Chance Peter B. Kyne
  • He jumped up eagerly—from force of habit dusting the seat of his riding breeches—and turned peremptorily to the mozo.

    The Long Chance Peter B. Kyne
  • But just before she rode in among them Sebastien and Pancho, his mozo, galloped out from among the trees.

    The Mystery of The Barranca Herman Whitaker
  • I forbid you to cuss my mozo without my permission, and I forbid you to damn this country in my hearing.

    The Long Chance Peter B. Kyne

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Difficulty index for mozo

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Word Value for mozo

15
16
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