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muck

[muhk] /mʌk/
noun
1.
moist farmyard dung, decaying vegetable matter, etc.; manure.
2.
a highly organic, dark or black soil, less than 50 percent combustible, often used as a manure.
3.
mire; mud.
4.
filth, dirt, or slime.
5.
defamatory or sullying remarks.
6.
a state of chaos or confusion:
to make a muck of things.
7.
Chiefly British Informal. something of no value; trash.
8.
(especially in mining) earth, rock, or other useless matter to be removed in order to get out the mineral or other substances sought.
verb (used with object)
9.
to manure.
10.
to make dirty; soil.
11.
to remove muck from (sometimes followed by out).
12.
Informal.
  1. to ruin; bungle (often followed by up).
  2. to put into a state of complete confusion (often followed by up).
Verb phrases
13.
muck about/around, Informal. to idle; waste time; loiter.
Origin of muck
1200-1250
1200-50; Middle English muc, muk < Old Norse myki cow dung
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for muck
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • But it's all the beastly blood and muck of the war that does it,—sends one back with a rush to things like that.

    Christopher and Columbus Countess Elizabeth Von Arnim
  • "Heave that muck overboard," he ordered some of those who stood idling in the waist.

    Captain Blood Rafael Sabatini
  • Ten bushels of quick lime, slaked with water or salt-brine previous to use, is enough for a cord of muck.

  • Now he was not only hopelessly down in the muck of poverty, but hopelessly dishonored.

    Garrison's Finish W. B. M. Ferguson
  • In his efforts to escape the hogs, the boy had wallowed round in the muck.

    A Busy Year at the Old Squire's Charles Asbury Stephens
British Dictionary definitions for muck

muck

/mʌk/
noun
1.
farmyard dung or decaying vegetable matter
2.
Also called muck soil. an organic soil rich in humus and used as a fertilizer
3.
dirt or filth
4.
earth, rock material, etc, removed during mining excavations
5.
(slang, mainly Brit) rubbish
7.
(slang, mainly Brit) make a muck of, to ruin or spoil
verb (transitive)
8.
to spread manure upon (fields, gardens, etc)
9.
to soil or pollute
10.
(often foll by out) to clear muck from
Word Origin
C13: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse myki dung, Norwegian myk
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for muck
n.

mid-13c., "cow dung and vegetable matter spread as manure," from a Scandinavian source, cf. Old Norse myki, mykr "cow dung," Danish møg, from Proto-Germanic *muk-, *meuk- "soft." Meaning "unclean matter generally" is from c.1300. Muck-sweat first attested 1690s.

v.

late 14c., "to dig in the ground," also "to remove manure," early 15c., "to spread manure, cover with muck," from muck (n.). Meaning "to make dirty" is from 1832; in the figurative sense, "to make a mess of," it is from 1886; to muck about "mess around" is from 1856. Related: Mucked; mucking.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for muck

Molotov cocktail

noun phrase

A grenade made by pouring gasoline into a bottle, adding a cloth wick, and igniting it

[WWII; fr Vyacheslav Molotov, Soviet premier, used and satirically named by Finnish fighters against the Soviet invasion of 1940]

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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