muckrake

[muhk-reyk]
verb (used without object), muckraked, muckraking.
to search for and expose real or alleged corruption, scandal, or the like, especially in politics.

Origin:
1675–85; obsolete muck rake a rake for use on muck or dung. See muck, rake1

muckraker, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To muckraker
Collins
World English Dictionary
muckrake (ˈmʌkˌreɪk)
 
n
1.  an agricultural rake for spreading manure
 
vb
2.  (intr) to seek out and expose scandal, esp concerning public figures
 
'muckraker
 
n
 
'muckraking
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

muckraker
"one who inquires into and publishes scandal and allegations of corruption among political and business leaders," popularized 1906 in speech by President Theodore Roosevelt, in allusion to character in Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress" (1684) who seeks worldly gain by raking filth.
"The men with the muck-rakes are often indispensable to the well-being of society, but only if they know when to stop raking the muck." [T. Roosevelt, quoted in "Cincinnati Enquirer," April 15, 1906.]
Related: Muckraking.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
He tells this toxic story with visual flair and the statistical punch of an inspired muckraker.
After twenty years in the field, he won renown as a muckraker and politician.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature