mystique

[mi-steek]
noun
1.
a framework of doctrines, ideas, beliefs, or the like, constructed around a person or object, endowing the person or object with enhanced value or profound meaning: the mystique of Poe.
2.
an aura of mystery or mystical power surrounding a particular occupation or pursuit: the mystique of nuclear science.

Origin:
1890–95; < French (adj.); see mystic

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World English Dictionary
mystique (mɪˈstiːk)
 
n
an aura of mystery, power, and awe that surrounds a person or thing: the mystique of the theatre; the mystique of computer programming
 
[C20: from French (adj): mystic]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

mystique
1891, "atmosphere of mystery," from Fr. mystique "a mystic," from L. mysticus (see mystic).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Admissions decision making has traditionally been a slow process, something
  that has added to the field's mystique.
All this interest in their mystique garners much needed attention for bat
  conservation.
It's a testament to the mystique of its products and to the ardent loyalty they
  have inspired over many decades.
Something approaching a mystique, though, soon began to surround the claims of
  the airmen.
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